As I was looking at my decorated Christmas tree I wondered for a moment why all of the branches were not covered with ornaments that I had collected from many different places. I have thought-out the years given each of my children an ornament every Christmas from as long as I can remember. If I am away from home during December I almost always look for tree ornaments that are somehow related to the area. I have Hawaiian ones, German ones and so on. . The above ornaments posted are ones I found while in Central California last December. Well, I do not think the monkey has anything to do with California but it was cute in has little suit.

Since my son will have his own tree this year with his own family I have given him all of the ornaments I have collected for him. This is about 21 or so ornaments. Ah, yes, that is why I have some bare branches, I remember now. I still have not gotten any this year but will most likely go for that annual search for a unique ornament. I am thinking of looking gin the local antique store too to find some unusual ones and of course one for my little grandson.

Although Christmas really is not about the Christmas tree and some profess it is a pagan activity I do not feel this way about the tree. To me it is a decoration used during winter but not necessary of a religious meaning. The tree is not something I worship and if some do not want it then it is up to them. It is to me very much like my Lakenvelder Cow ceramic figurine and the others. If you look at the bible it describes the use of idol work of cows and other objects and how you should not display them in your home. It is something I could really live without.

This is one story I have found about the origin of the tree; if is true of not we will never know but it is interesting one to read.
The fir tree has a long association with Christianity, it began in Germany almost a 1000 years ago when St Boniface, who converted the German people to Christianity, was said to have come across a group of pagans worshipping an oak tree. In anger, St Boniface is said to have cut down the oak tree and to his amazement a young fir tree sprung up from the roots of the oak tree. St Boniface took this as a sign of the Christian faith. But it was not until the 16th century that fir trees were brought indoors at Christmas time.

Deuteronomy 12:30-31

12:30 Take heed to thyself that thou be not snared by following them, after that they be destroyed from before thee; and that thou inquire not after their gods, saying, How did these nations serve their gods? even so will I do likewise.

12:31 Thou shalt not do so unto the LORD thy God: for every abomination to the LORD, which he hateth, have they done unto their gods; for even their sons and their daughters they have burnt in the fire to their gods.

12:32 What thing so ever I command you, observe to do it: thou shalt not add thereto, nor diminish from it.

These customs have lost their pagan connotations and have become religiously neutral. It is not sinful, for example, for an architect to copy the pillars found in Greek and Roman temples. Things that were once “pagan” do not necessarily remain pagan.

Actually Christmas is not even mentioned in the Bible and the date of Jesus birth is not know. Some religious have banded Christmas including the Puritans at Plymouth. In America, the Pilgrim’s second governor, William Bradford, a Puritan, tried hard to stamp out all “pagan mockery” at Christmas time. 4 Christmas trees were not used by Puritans in colonial times. However, if they were, they would certainly have been forbidden. Some religious groups oppose trees because of a literal interpretation of the quotation from Jeremiah.

Jeremiah 10:2-4: “Thus saith the LORD, Learn not the way of the heathen, and be not dismayed at the signs of heaven; for the heathen are dismayed at them. For the customs of the people are vain: for one cutteth a tree out of the forest, the work of the hands of the workman, with the axe. They deck it with silver and with gold; they fasten it with nails and with hammers, that it move not.” (KJV).

The fir tree has a long association with Christianity, it began in Germany almost a 1000 years ago when St Boniface, who converted the German people to Christianity, was said to have come across a group of pagans worshipping an oak tree. In anger, St Boniface is said to have cut down the oak tree and to his amazement a young fir tree sprung up from the roots of the oak tree. St Boniface took this as a sign of the Christian faith. But it was not until the 16th century that fir trees were brought indoors at Christmas time.

Traditional German Carol

O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree
How lovely are your branches.
In summer sun and winter snow,
A dress of green you always show.
O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree,
How lovely are your branches.
O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree,
With happiness we greet you
When decked with candles once a year,
You fill our hearts with yuletide cheer.
O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree,
With happiness we greet you

O Tannenbaum, O Tannenbaum, wie treu sind deine Blätter.
O Tannenbaum, O Tannenbaum, wie treu sind deine Blätter.
Du grünst nicht nur zur Sommerzeit, nein auch im Winter, wenn es schneit.
O Tannenbaum, O Tannenbaum, wie treu sind deine Blätter.
Traditional German Carol

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